Feeding punctures of mirids and other plant-sucking insects and their effect on cotton
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Feeding punctures of mirids and other plant-sucking insects and their effect on cotton

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Cotton -- Diseases and pests.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Caption title.

Statementby W.V. King and W.S. Cook.
SeriesTechnical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 296, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 296.
ContributionsCook, W. S. 1898-, United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
The Physical Object
Pagination12 p., 3 p. of plates :
Number of Pages12
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23004727M

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Food sought by hemipterans may be the blood of vertebrates [e.g., Cimicidae (bed bugs)], the hemolymph of other invertebrates [e.g., Reduviidae (ambush bugs) and Gerridae (water striders)] or the cytoplasm and sap of plants [many Miridae (plant bugs) and Pentatomidae (stink bugs) (76)].Cited by: Insect puncture marks after 3 h feeding. C: punctures of mirids and other plant-sucking insects and their effect on. cotton. Agrie. The Miridae are unique within the Heteroptera in their possession of specialized setae known as trichobothria on the middle and hind femora. Most species lack the pair of ocelli found situated between the compound eyes of the majority of heteropteran species; the exception to this rule is the subfamily Isometopinae, which is thought to be the sister group of all remaining Miridae (the most. The head is angled downwards from their body and features a long needle-like feeding tube that is used to spear prey and suck their blood. Nymphs (or larvae) are usually similar in appearance to the adults, but without wings. Mirids usually overwinter as eggs. Beneficial Because: Mirid bugs can contribute to the control of many different plant.

Mirid Bug, Creontiodes biseratense (Distant) damage on Cotton in Coimbatore Surulivelu, T and B. Dhara jothi During the month of December , mirid bug infestation was observed in an epidemic form in CICR, Regional Station Farm, Coimbatore on Bt cotton hybrids. The insect both nymphs and adults damage developing flower buds and tender bolls. King W. V., Cook W. S. Feeding punctures of Mirids and other plant-sucking insects and their effect on cotton. USDA Tech. Bul. LaBreque G. C. Principles of Insect Chemosterilization. The Miridae are the most species rich family-level grouping of true bugs, with approximat described species recognized as of They range from mm in length and show a range of coloration from the somber to brilliant red and black aposematically colored species.   Feeding punctures of mirids and other plantsucking insects and their effect on cotton. Miles, P. W. (). The stylet movements of a plant-sucking bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus Dall. (Heteroptera: The nature of the sheath material in the feeding punctures produced by the potato leaf hopper and the three-cornered alfalfa hopper.

Poor germination of seeds is of common occurrence in the Umbelliferae. Probably the most important of several causes is the presence of non-viable seeds which have no embryo. Embryoless seeds have been found to result from the feeding of theLygus bug on the developing seed. The insect seems to inject a toxic component of its oral secretions while feeding; this causes degeneration of the embryo. Mirid bugs are usually oval or elongated in shape with a triangular-shaped segment at the base of their wings. The head is angled downwards from their body and features a long needle-like feeding tube that is used to spear prey and suck their blood. Nymphs (or larvae) are usually similar in appearance to the adults, but without wings. Mirids usually overwinter as eggs. Similar antifeedant effects of imidacloprid have been reported on other plant sucking insects, such as the aphids M. nicotianae and M. persi Daniels et al. 29 and Cui et al. 30 also found that sublethal dose of thiamethoxam and IPP10 (a novel neonicotinoid), caused reduction in xylem and phloem feeding by Rhopalosiphum padi on wheat. Insects with Sucking/Piercing Mouthparts. Many insects feed on a liquid diet (i.e., plant fluids) for which chewing mouthparts are not effective. Many of these insects have a beak, referred to as a proboscis, that is modified to suck up liquids in a manner similar to humans sucking through a straw.