On the intercourse between English and Bohemian Wycliffites
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On the intercourse between English and Bohemian Wycliffites in the early years of the fifteenth century. by Reginald Lane Poole

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Published by Spottiswoode in London .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Pagination6 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16057921M

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the Intercourse Between English and Bohemian Wycliffites in the Early Years of the Fifteenth Century," English Historical Seview 7 (), pp. ; R. R. Betts, "English and Cech Influences on the Hussite Movement," Royal Historical Society Transactions 21 (4th series, ), pp. , reprinted in R. R. Betts, Essays in. Slavonic Review, vii (), ff; K. L. Poole, "On the Intercourse between Eng-lish and Bohemian Wycliffites in the Early Years of the Fifteenth Century," English His-torical Review t vii (), Further discussion of the question of Wycliff . Poole, Reginald L. "On the Intercourse between English and Bohemian Wycliffites in the Early Years of the Fifteenth Century." The English Historical Review 7, no. 26 (): Porter, H. C. Reformation and Reaction in Tudor Cambridge, by H. C. Porter %O Reprint of the ed., with a new preface. %O Includes bibliographies. Reginald L. POOLE, On the Intercourse between English and Bohemian Wycliffites in the Early Years of the Fifteenth Century [Notes and Documents], in: EHR 7, , p. R. GARNETT, A Contemporary Oration on Pope Alexander VI [Notes and Documents], in: .

Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide. De scientia Dei (On God's Knowledge) is one of the few major texts by John Wyclif that has not already been published. According to John A. Robson, the De scientia Dei is 'in some way, the most important of all the treatises' of Wyclif's so-called Summa de ente. It was probably written in , when the editorial project of the Summa de ente was in its final stages, and when Wyclif . In that year his name appears second, after a bishop, on a commission which the English Government sent to Bruges to discuss with the representatives of Gregory XI, and, if possible settle, a number of points in dispute between the king and the pope. The conference came to no very satisfactory conclusion, but it appears to mark the beginning of. "The essays in Cather Studies, Volume 8 explore the many locales and cultures informing Willa Cather's fiction. A lifelong Francophile, Cather first visited France in and returned repeatedly throughout her life. Her visits to France influenced not only her writing but also her interpretation of other worlds; for example, while visiting the American Southwest in , a region that.

  For a long time no direct relations between the two countries were established, but during the stirring period of the religious revolt of the Bohemian Estates against Ferdinand II., when the Czechs rose in arms against the treacherous Habsburgs, and elected a new king in Frederick of the Palatinate, dynastic ties again drew Bohemia nearer to.   See Poole, Reginald L., “On the Intercourse Between English and Bohemian Wycliffites in the Early Years of the Fifteenth Century”, English Historical Review 7 (), pp. –; Betts, R. R., “English and Cech Influences on the Hussite Movement” Royal Historical Society Transactions 21 (4th series, ), by: The beginnings of the Brethren's Church in England are an interesting chapter in the commerce of thought between Germany and that country. The German dynasty on the English throne had attracted a strong colony of their countrymen; towards the middle of the eighteenth century London alone numbered from to Germans among its inhabitants. Lollards or Wycliffites. Groups of lay preachers or mummers strolled the English countryside ca. They preached a new reformed Christian doctrine based .